Republicans retain house, picking up about 10 seats

Republicans retain house, picking up about 10 seats

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Republicans retain house
Republicans retain house

Republicans retain house, picking up about 10 seats

Republicans captured control of the Senate by picking up at least 7 seats from the Democrats without losing any of their own, regaining the majority they lost in 2006. The races in Alaska and Virginia remain too close to call, while Louisiana will vote in a run-off election on December 6, 2014, because none of the candidates reached the required 50% threshold for victory during the November 4, 2014, jungle primary.

Since 2008, Obama Has Lost 69 House Seats, 14 Senate Seats

Wikipedia: The 2014 United States elections were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, in the middle of Democratic President Barack Obama‘s second term. During this midterm election year, all 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives and 36 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate were contested; along with 39 state and territorial governorships, 46 state legislatures (except Louisiana, Mississippi, New Jersey, and Virginia),[1] four territorial legislatures, and numerous state and local races. This midterm election became the most expensive in history, with total spending reaching $3.7 billion (including spending by outside entities[2]), while producing the lowest turnout since 1942.[3][4][5]

The elections saw sweeping gains by the Republican Party in the Senate, House, and in numerous gubernatorial, state, and local races. The Republicans gained control of the Senate for the first time since 2006, and increased their majority in the House.[6] The Republicans also gained two seats in governors’ races.[7]

Overall, the elections resulted in the largest Republican majority in the entire country in nearly a century, with 54 seats in the Senate, 247 (56.78%) in the House, 31 governorships (62%), and 68 state legislative chambers. Moreover, Republicans gained their largest majority in the House since 1928, the largest majority in Congress overall since 1928, and the largest majority of state legislatures since 1928.[8][9][10]

Political scientist Gary C. Jacobson argues that the voters treated the election as a referendum on the economy and especially on Obama’s presidency. The result was the most partisan, nationalized, and president-centered midterm election in at least 60 years.

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